Close This Window

Please download official ILL logos here

 

For using on the web or on a screenFor printing in high resolutionWhite version, for dark backgrounds

Download PNG

Download AI

Download white PNG

Download JPG

 

Download white AI

New gel to promote bone growth on orthopaedic and dental implants. 31.03.2014

Back to ILL Homepage
www > Press and news > Press room > Press releases > New gel to promote bone growth on orthopaedic and dental implants. 31.03.2014
English French Deutsch 

Press room

New gel to promote bone growth on orthopaedic and dental implants. 31.03.2014

A research group at Uppsala University, Sweden has developed a new responsive coating for implants used in surgery to improve their integration into bone and to prevent rejection. Neutron scattering experiments at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France have shown how a protein that promotes bone growth binds to this surface and can be released in a controlled way.


Orthopaedic and dental implants must last for many years.  Success for these surgical components depends on their integration into adjacent bone tissue.  Gels made by modifying hyaluronan, a large biological molecule, can be used to coat implants.  A new paper in Advanced Engineering Materials shows that the coated titanium surfaces can bind to protein molecules which promote bone formation.  These can be released slowly once the surface comes in contact with a solution of calcium ions.  This process would stimulate the growth of bone on the implant.


The gel layers, a few nanometres thick, were characterised using neutron reflection at the ILL, a technique that provides a detailed picture of what happens at a surface. In their new paper, the research team showed that the protein BMP-2 that encourages bone growth was bound to the gel.  They also demonstrated that the layer of protein was stable in water but could be released slowly by adding solutions containing calcium, a process that was observed in real time using neutron reflection to track the amount of protein at the surface.


The research group has now launched trials of similar materials for metal implants in rabbits.  These ongoing studies are being conducted in collaboration with the Swedish Agricultural University in Uppsala and they constitute a step towards transferring the results to clinical applications.


Quotes

‘Interdisciplinary research and partnerships allow advanced analytical tools to be applied to important but difficult medical and scientific challenges.  This exciting work comes from shared goals of chemists and physicists as well as the Centre for Neutron Scattering at Uppsala University and the laboratories in Grenoble’, says Professor Adrian Rennie.


‘We envisage that the materials will be used in medicine to modulate the healing process in bone’, says Associate Professor Dmitri Ossipov.  He continues, ‘Neutrons are an ideal tool to understand the interactions of metal surfaces, polysaccharide biopolymers, and proteins thanks to a contrast matching technique that highlights only the protein components at the interface.’


‘Neutron scattering techniques are increasingly relevant to optimise bio-materials and to study systems that relate to health.  The importance of combining conventional laboratory studies with those at a large scale facility to give a complete picture of a process was proven once more.  This work arose from a studentship funded by the Institut Laue-Langevin which makes us proud of our PhD programme.’ says Dr Giovanna Fragneto of the Institut Laue-Langevin.




Re.: I. Berts, D. Ossipov, G. Fragneto, A. Frisk, A.R. Rennie, ‘Polymeric smart coating strategy for titanium implants’, Advanced Engineering Materials (2014).

For more information please contact

James Romero at Proof Communication / +448456801866

Adrian Rennie, tel: +46 (0)70-4250914, +46 (0)18-471 3596

or Ida Berts, tel: +49-(0)89 2180 2439




Note to editors


About ILL – The Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) is an international research centre based in Grenoble, France. It has led the world in neutron-scattering science and technology for more than 40 years, since experiments began in 1972. ILL operates one of the most intense neutron sources in the world, feeding beams of neutrons to a suite of 40 high-performance instruments that are constantly upgraded. Each year 1,200 researchers from over 40 countries visit ILL to conduct research into condensed matter physics, (green) chemistry, biology, nuclear physics, and materials science. The UK, along with France and Germany is an associate and major funder of the ILL.


About the Uppsala University - Please visit the university website.

Uppsala University is the oldest university in the Nordic countries, with a living cultural environment and fantastic student life. There are 40,000 students here, and they are seen, heard, and noticed everywhere. World-class research and high quality education pursued here benefit society and business on a global level. The University is characterized by diversity and breadth, with international frontline research at nine faculties and limitless educational offerings at undergraduate and master levels. - See more at: www.uu.se/en/about-uu/in-brief/

Uppsala University is the oldest university in the Nordic countries, with a living cultural environment and fantastic student life. There are 40,000 students here, and they are seen, heard, and noticed everywhere. World-class research and high quality education pursued here benefit society and business on a global level. The University is characterized by diversity and breadth, with international frontline research at nine faculties and limitless educational offerings at undergraduate and master levels. - See more at: www.uu.se/en/about-uu/in-brief/